beware of æsthetics
Basically, the best way for me to rekindle inspiration is to write a scene poorly and throw it away. That gets my mind working on how to actually fix the problem. Writer’s block almost always goes away after I’ve tried a scene in a couple of different ways, sometimes from different perspectives, sometimes with wildly different ‘takes’ on the scene. I try to shake things up in a few of the takes.
Brandon Sanderson (via aresmarked)
throughthexhole:

deadlinejon:

stunningpicture:

This is what happens to a basketball court when the pipes burst

this is the greatest basketball challenge of all time


Space Jam 2 is looking great

throughthexhole:

deadlinejon:

stunningpicture:

This is what happens to a basketball court when the pipes burst

this is the greatest basketball challenge of all time

Space Jam 2 is looking great

lunarch-sounds:

brichibi:

avengette:

cuntsman-sniper:

destielkills:

twowandsandadrink:

totemo-kawaii—ne:

omgtsn:

shittingllamas:

dudewhodoesthings:

kystokeable:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

No. 

No this is not funny.

Whether or not it is a joke, I’ve gone onto the channel and there are multiple videos similar to this, which makes me think they’re fake.

Doesn’t matter. 

These videos enforce the idea to parents that yes, the answer to stop your child becoming obsessed with games is to DESTROY them.

No. This is not funny. It is things like this that cause events such as the father who SHOT his daughter’s laptop to bits to occur. These jokes enforce the attitude that people are ‘wrong’ for loving games.

For wanting to play games. 

For some people (including myself), games are a serious escape from horrid realities. The only escape some people can get. The idea that this man (boy?) is wrong for being so upset is disgusting to me?

This is horrific. This is abuse. This is wrong.

This is a sure fire way to get your kids to hate you.

do people not understand how much video games cost?

Video games are a multi-billion dollar business. Some people are good at it. Very good. Do not squander your child’s talents, help them realize them and strengthen them. There are other ways to get your child outside without destroying their games and everything they work for. This won’t solve anything; this will only set them back further.

do this to your childs anything and they will automatically hate you/not trust you

It doesn’t matter what it is

It doesn’t matter if its their video games or if its their smoking pipe

If you just destroy it/throw it away, you are giving no explanation as to why it’s bad/you don’t want them to have it

This can actually psychologically mess a kid up because you teach them that if someone doesn’t like something, they should destroy it

That can lead to some serious problems with socializing with others and other things

dont do that to people

dont

I had a notebook I used to write in all the time. I did that thing that Margo did in Paper Towns where she criss crossed her writing, but I did it so I’d have enough room to write everything. I took it everywhere wtih me and wouldn’t let my parents even start the car unless I had in in my lap. My dad got really annoyed by this and said I needed to throw the notebook away, what was written in it wasn’t important anyway (it was to me, very much so). So one day he took and ran it through the paper shredder.
Ever since I’ve had an intense fear of losing my notebooks and currently have a colletion of 53 blank notebooks and 16 that have been written in because I’ve started hoarding them.
Long story short, don’t fucking do this to your kids. You think it’s harmless and some people even think it’s clever, but you’re really just an asshole and are causing actual psychological problems for your children.

I have a plush rabbit that I’ve had since Easter of the year I was born (I was about 2 months old when I got it). It quickly became a comfort thing for me and I used to go everywhere with it as a child. When my mum and dad split up was when I became kind of dependent on having it around.
If ever I did anything wrong mum always threatened to take it away from me, which obviously caused my 6-year-old self to kick and scream and cry because I needed it.
One day I lost it for 6 or 7 months (turns out it was in my room the whole time but shh it was very well hidden & neither myself or my mum know how it got there)
That was the point that my mum realised she couldn’t threaten to take it away because holy shit I changed so much in those months.

Seriously, if your child is dependent on something, or takes great comfort in having it around
DO NOT TAKE IT FROM THEM.
It does not matter how old your child is, what their comfort item is, if it’s a video games console - don’t take it from them. If it’s their phone - don’t take it from them. If they’re 18 and still sleep with a teddybear - don’t take it from them.


This also goes for if your child is self-harming. If they have a blade in their bedroom and you find it DO NOT THROW IT OUT. Talk to them about it, be as supportive as you can, but do not think “oh well if I get rid of it they’ll be fine”. It can be seriously distressing and also lead to them becoming creative with what they use.

Getting a job and becoming an active member of society is important, but this is not the way to get your kid to do so. As others have previously stated, this is how to get your kid to hate you. Have a problem with your kids? Talk. To. Them.

Stop acting like your kid’s hobby is hazardous.  Video games, comic books, cosplay, stop assuming that something you perceive as strange has a negative effect, because I bet if this boy was into football as much as he was into video games this video would’ve never happened. Destroying what your kid loves will only create hostility, instead, try understanding it and not treating it like trash.  

Dear god this is sad

ppaction:

NOPE. 
peakcapitolism:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Yeah it dates to at least the French Revolution and the early industrial revolution

peakcapitolism:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Yeah it dates to at least the French Revolution and the early industrial revolution

Please don’t forget about Ferguson, and listen to what black kids have to say, but don’t support FCKH8

acacophony:

They profit from civil rights movements to sell T-shirts and do not donate proceeds to charity. They’re bad people. I’m not reblogging the post that made me want to say this because I don’t want to give them more notes.

They say that ‘Guns don’t kill people, people kill people.’ Well I think the gun helps. If you just stood there and yelled BANG, I don’t think you’d kill too many people.
Eddie Izzard
Dear Radical Feminists,

racismschool:

I would like to talk to you about my vulva. First and foremost, I want you to know that the vulva I currently have on my person has been with me since birth. This is an important distinction, I know. Second, although “vulva” is correct, I usually refer to my vulva as a vagina and for the remainder of this letter, I will do so.

RadFems, I love my vagina. I believe my vagina to be better than most. I know that we shouldn’t say things like that but you see, my vagina has given me immense pleasure and the only way that I feel I can truly let her know that I love her is to tell her that she is the very best. My vagina has been with me through thick and thin. Never once getting up to walk away or turning her back on me. During my granny panty week, my vagina speaks to other parts of my body. She asks my uterus to be kind to me during this time of shedding. I am one of the lucky ones. I rarely get cramps or mood swings. As a matter of fact, due to a slight iron deficiency, my granny panty week tends to only make me sleepy. My vagina and her corresponding parts, love me.

The problem, dear RadFems, is that although I believe my vagina to be superior in look, smell, taste, touch, elasticity and performance, I myself, am not a vagina. I am an adult woman with a mind, soul and body. My physical body is comprised of many parts. None more important than the other. My need to write to you comes from your insistence on things that only reside in a patriarchal ideology. As important as my vagina is to me, if I were to somehow lose pieces of my vagina, I would not then be less of a woman. It pains me to know that you have such a low opinion of yourselves and other women, that you have reduced us in a way that only the most sexists of patriarchal beings can do. I am a woman. I was a woman before I knew how my vagina worked, after I had my first orgasm and will continue to be so even if I leave my house tomorrow and lose every defining characteristic of my vulva.

I was being honest when I said that I believe my vagina is better than most. It is. I was also being honest when I told you that my vagina has never walked away or turned her back on me. The things is, my vagina can’t walk away. It’s a vagina. My vagina can’t turn it’s back on me. It’s a vagina. My vagina is not a “Her.” It’s a vagina. These all seem like items most people know. Yet, somehow RadFems, you don’t.

My vagina is amazing. I truly do love it! I carry it with me everywhere that I go! Still, it’s a vagina. It isn’t my womanhood. It isn’t my defining characteristic. It isn’t even writing this letter to you now. It’s just sitting there, waiting for me to play with it.

Finally RadFems, I would like to end this letter by reminding you that woman, does not have or need an additional descriptor to be true. As a womanist, I don’t care what “Kind” of woman you are, I care that you are a woman. You aren’t more or less of a woman if your descriptor includes, race, religion, birth assignment, finances or even perfume preference. The betterment of woman is the betterment of women. You don’t get to define me. The patriarchy has already done so. Shockingly, you use the same verbiage as they do.

Sincerely,

My-Name-is-NOT-Vagina

it’s 4:13 am

blake-the-half-demon:

furbearingbrick:

mehreenkasana:

Except you are so daft, it’s not even remotely amusing.
The USB key was essentially developed by a computer whiz to store data, information and other software in a mobile source from one computer to the other. The slasher you see up there was created to cut open solid objects like boxes, ropes, etc but to also carve and slice inanimate objects. The lighter you see up there was made for cigarettes. The first three objects have domestic, legitimate use.
The gun, in contrast, has no other domestic objectives and usage. It was specifically made to kill. That is all. Kill. You don’t use a gun to store software programs, you don’t use a gun to peel an orange, you don’t use a gun to light a cigarette up. You use a gun to kill.
Try another comparison. Stop embarrassing yourselves. 

APPLY COLD WATER TO BURNED AREA

NAH MAN IT’S A THIRD DEGREE BURN HERE THE PERSON NEEDS A SKIN GRAPH

blake-the-half-demon:

furbearingbrick:

mehreenkasana:

Except you are so daft, it’s not even remotely amusing.

The USB key was essentially developed by a computer whiz to store data, information and other software in a mobile source from one computer to the other. The slasher you see up there was created to cut open solid objects like boxes, ropes, etc but to also carve and slice inanimate objects. The lighter you see up there was made for cigarettes. The first three objects have domestic, legitimate use.

The gun, in contrast, has no other domestic objectives and usage. It was specifically made to kill. That is all. Kill. You don’t use a gun to store software programs, you don’t use a gun to peel an orange, you don’t use a gun to light a cigarette up. You use a gun to kill.

Try another comparison. Stop embarrassing yourselves. 

APPLY COLD WATER TO BURNED AREA

NAH MAN IT’S A THIRD DEGREE BURN HERE THE PERSON NEEDS A SKIN GRAPH

anna-univverse:

SOMEBODY FUCKING GOT ON MY SCHOOLS NETWORK AND PRINTED KOMAEDA ALL OVER THE BACK OF OUR CLASSES WORKSHEETS I


"I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me, too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you." - Frida Kahlo

"I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me, too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you." - Frida Kahlo